Tag Archives: delivery

Korean Food Delivery: Living in the Lap of Luxury

2 Dec
Here it is, wrapped up nice in saran wrap, stacked neatly and still super hot.

Here it is, wrapped up nice in saran wrap, stacked neatly and still super hot.

It finally happened.

I ordered food from one of the magnets that I have stuck on my door.

Everyday I come home to find another delicious looking meal magnet stuck to the outside of my apartment. I bring it in and stick it on the inside.  Read it, imagine that I am going to find the courage to call and order it but I never do.

My dream when I came to Korea was that I could call a delivery service, a scooter man would bring me a meal in a big plastic rubbermaid container, dishes and all. I would leave my dishes outside my door and he would come and pick them up again later.  No fuss, no muss.  Yes, these are the types of dreams that I have.  It is a glorious thought.

Someone asked me if I wanted to go bungee jumping today.  They were surprised when I said that is something I have no desire to try.  You can’t eat and bungee jump at the same time. In fact, bungee jumping might cause me to not want to eat anything (GASP).  Opening up that plastic treasure chest was thrill enough for me.

How to order Korean Delivery

Delivery is amazing in Korea.  It is probably more amazing if you can speak Korean.  I know very limited Korean. So, how do I order food you ask?

  1. I learn how to say my address in Korean and how to read the food that I want.
  2. I write it all down on a piece of paper.
  3. I listen to Survivor – Eye of the Tiger to pump myself up
  4. I call a take out number.  No answer. Probably closed.  Throw that one way.
  5. I choose another take out place and something else I want to eat.  I don’t write these down, I just remember them.  Ain’t nobody got time for that anymore.
  6. I call.  They answer. It goes like this:

Food Gatekeeper: “Yeobusayo?” (Hello)

Me: “Nae, waegookin-iyayo” (Yes, I am a foreigner) I want to warn them they are going to have a bad time.

FG:  “Yeobusayo?”

Me: “Yeah…uh…daebal? kinchanayo?” (yeah…uhh..takeout? Is that ok?)

FG: *CLICK*

So, they hung up on me.  This is actually a really hard blow to take.  They had food.  They were open.  I practiced saying your address.  Now I am hungry, depressed and angry.

There are two options now.  Text a Korean friend to call for you (this always works, but I hate to be such a bother). Or, order chicken.  I don’t know what it is about chicken. I can always order chicken easily.

I try again:

Chicken Peeps: “Yeobusayo?” (Hello)

Me: “Nae, waegookin-iyayo” (Yes, I am a foreigner) I want to warn them they are going to have a bad time.

CP:  “Yeobusayo?”

Me: “Yeah…uh…daebal. Sal sal Cheeken jusaeyo.” (Yeah…uhh.. daebal *confidence boost* sal sal chicken please)

CP: “something something oedie something” (something something, where)

Me: [Address that I have memorized]

CP: [Something else in Korean, I am not really sure but I know that they are really trying to get me this chicken. ]

Me: [repeats the food that I want and my address until someone says “yes” in English]

And it usually ends by someone telling me the price of the food, or reverting to English, or someone hanging up and leaving me wondering if the chicken is actually coming.  With chicken: the chicken always comes.  I don’t know why, but the chicken people just have my back.

How it Actually Happened Today

So remember earlier when I said that I ordered the food that came with all the dishes? Well, technically, I did.  I called them, twice.  But they hung up on me and I ended up texting a friend to call for me.  Listen, I almost got the woman who owns the 7-eleven downstairs to call for me.  I was hungry! It’s Monday.

BUT if I had decided to get chicken, they would have came.  The BEST part about calling for chicken. Since I already went through the awkwardness of calling and giving my address.  Every other time I call it goes like this:

Me: “Sal sal cheeken jusaeyo” (Sal sal chicken please)

Chicken Peeps: “Naaae.” (Yeeees)

*CLICK*

My number is on file, I just have to call and say what I want.  Then it comes!

Alright so, my friend called for me.  The food comes.  We take it out, feast too much.  I clean the dishes (I don’t think that this is expected, I just couldn’t bring myself to pack them back in there with food on them) and they are sitting outside my door right now.  Waiting to be taken away.

For a mere $14 CAD we got plates, cutlery, mains and side dishes and delivery.  This was definitely too much food.  There was also like five fried eggs.  I am not really sure why because we didn't ask for any. Pictured here is: kimchi bokumbap (kimchi fried rice), tuna kimchi jjigae (in the stoneware), donkassu (fried battered pork), a plate full of fried eggs, soup, kimchi and banchan (side dishes).

For a mere $14 CAD we got plates, cutlery, mains and side dishes and delivery. This was definitely too much food. There was also like five fried eggs. I am not really sure why because we didn’t ask for any. Pictured here is: kimchi bokumbap (kimchi fried rice), tuna kimchi jjigae (in the stoneware), donkassu (fried battered pork), a plate full of fried eggs, soup, kimchi and banchan (side dishes).

 

So if you are in Korea and you are not in the mood to go out and get your own food (you were out too late last night, or you had an exhausting day at work, or you just want to experience a new dining experience, maybe you have access to a rooftop!) give it a try.  It is really not that hard if you are willing to suffer through a few hangups until you get someone who is willing to try to decipher your thick, unfamiliar accent.

If you are in a hotel: lucky you! Just go to the front desk, they will hook you up with menus. They will call and have it delivered to your room for you.

Hooray for food!

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